William G. Gale
William Gale is the Arjay and Frances Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy and a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. His research focuses on tax policy, fiscal policy, pensions and saving behavior. William also sits on the board of EconoFact.

Are Taxes (And Also Spending) Progressive?

November 11, 2019

The Issue:

The recent claim that in 2018, the 400 wealthiest American families paid, on average, a smaller percentage of their income in taxes (23 percent) than the percentage paid by the bottom half of all U.S. households (24 percent) has generated enormous attention and controversy. This assertion is featured

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Staring Down the Debt Limit

July 22, 2019

The Issue:

In what has become a predictable cycle, policymakers meet under pressure to raise the “debt ceiling,” the legal limit on the amount of debt the federal government can accumulate. In spite of the frequency with which this situation occurs, discussion around the debt ceiling is often shrouded in confusion.

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The Political Considerations in Fiscal Policy (VIDEO)

June 20, 2019
This conversation was recorded on December 13, 2018.

 

Decisions on government spending and taxation have a direct impact on the economy. Yet fiscal policy is inherently political. Past proposals to create a board— like the Federal Reserve Board — for fiscal policy, that would be comprised of experts

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The Distributional Effects of Fiscal Policy (VIDEO)

April 28, 2019

In this video, William G. Gale of The Brookings Institution, and EconoFact co-founder Michael Klein discuss the distributional effects of fiscal policy and the progressivity of the US tax system. 

The combination of tax and spending policies in the United States is progressive - but less so than in major European
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How Big is the Problem of Tax Evasion?

April 3, 2019

The Issue:

Tax evasion – the act of not paying taxes that are owed – is illegal and is an underappreciated problem in the United States. About one out of every six dollars owed in federal taxes is not paid. The amount of unpaid taxes every year is plausibly about three-quarters the size of the entire annual

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